Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
Give me the CHEAT SHEET!
Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet - NO

Mutual funds continue to be among the most popular investing tools for both individual and professional investors who seek to beat the market or simply access a broad swath of investments rather than purchase stocks or bonds individually. Unlike stocks or exchange-traded funds, mutual funds trade just once per day, and many investors own them as part of a defined contribution retirement plan such as a 401(k) or an individual retirement account, known as an IRA. The price of a mutual fund share is known as the fund's net asset value, or NAV.
If this sounds similar to banks’ high-yield savings accounts or money market accounts, it is. The largest difference lies in the ability for yields on money market mutual funds to rise proportionately with interest rates. For example, as interest rates have risen, the yields on most bank  money market accounts (which are set by the banks themselves) have stayed relatively flat, while money market mutual fund yields have increased.
Industries generally need long-term loans, which are provided in the capital market. However, the capital market depends upon the nature of and the conditions in the money market. The short-term interest rates of the money market influence the long-term interest rates of the capital market. Thus, money market indirectly helps the industries through its link with and influence on long-term capital market.
What to watch for: The eAccess Money Market account doesn’t have check-writing privileges and doesn’t offer a debit card, an ATM card for ATM access or the ability to send an outbound wire transfer. But you’re allowed to make up to six withdrawals via Online Banking per month. These can be made either via an external account transfer or byway of an ACH, which electronically debits your eAccess Money Market and sends the money to another financial institution. These may not exceed $250,000 per monthly statement cycle. United States citizens and permanent residents 18 years or older throughout the U.S. are eligible for the eAccess Money Market account, as long as they don’t live in New Jersey or New York.
In 2008, following the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers, the venerable Reserve Primary Fund broke the buck: It held millions of Lehman's debt obligations, and panicked redemptions by its investors caused its NAV to fall to 97 cents per share. The pullout of money caused the Reserve Primary Fund to close and triggered mayhem throughout the money markets.
Government Normally at least 99.5% of the fund’s total assets are invested in cash, U.S. government securities and/or repurchase agreements that are collateralized fully (i.e., collateralized by cash or government securities)—including at least 80% in U.S. government securities and repurchase agreements for those securities. Certain issuers of U.S. government securities (e.g., “Government-Sponsored Enterprises” such as Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Home Loan Banks) are sponsored or chartered by Congress, but their securities are neither issued by nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.