Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
Give me the CHEAT SHEET!
Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet - NO

*THE OPERATOR OF THIS WEB SITE IS NOT A LENDER, does not arrange, facilitate or broker loans to lenders and does not make short term cash loans or credit decisions. It is not an agent, representative, arranger, facilitator or broker of any lender and does not endorse any lender or charge you for any service or product. This Web Site does not constitute an offer or solicitation to lend. This site allows you to submit your information to a lender in order for a lender to determine if they may be able to offer you a short-term loan. However, providing your information on this Web Site does not mean that a lender will be able to work with you or that you will be approved for a short-term loan. Cash advances should only be used by you to solve immediate cash needs and should not be considered a long-term solution. Not all lenders can provide up to $2,500. Cash transfer times may vary between lenders and may depend on your individual financial institution. For details, questions or concerns regarding your short-term cash loan, please contact your lender directly. Lender services may not be available to residents of all states based on individual lender requirements. This service is not available in Connecticut. Furthermore, this service is not available in New York or to New York borrowers due to interest rate limits under New York law.
Institutional prime and institutional municipal money market mutual funds are funds that do not qualify as retail funds—i.e., they may be held by institutional investors. These funds are subject to potential liquidity fees and redemption gates, and will price and transact at a floating NAV (meaning that the NAV will be priced to 4 decimal places, e.g. $1.0000, and will experience fluctuations from time to time).
The SEC would normally be the regulator to address the risks to investors taken by money market funds, however to date the SEC has been internally politically gridlocked. The SEC is controlled by five commissioners, no more than three of which may be the same political party. They are also strongly enmeshed with the current mutual fund industry, and are largely divorced from traditional banking industry regulation. As such, the SEC is not concerned over overall credit extension, money supply, or bringing shadow banking under the regulatory umbrella of effective credit regulation.
In the wholesale market, commercial paper is a popular borrowing mechanism because the interest rates are higher than for bank time deposits or Treasury bills, and a greater range of maturities is available, from overnight to 270 days. However, the risk of default is significantly higher for commercial paper than for bank or government instruments.
Over time, money market fund "depositors" felt more and more secure, and not really at risk. Likewise, on the other end, corporations saw the attractive interest rates and incredibly easy ability to constantly roll over short term commercial paper. Using rollovers they then funded longer and longer term obligations via the money markets. This expands credit. It’s also over time clearly long-term borrowing on one end, funded by an on-demand depositor on the other, with some substantial obfuscation as to what is ultimately going on in between.