Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
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Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet - NO

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An active investor who has time and knowledge to hunt around for the best possible short-term debt instruments offering the best possible interest rates at their preferred levels of risk may prefer investing on their own in the various available instruments. On the other hand, a less-savvy investor may prefer taking the money market fund route by delegating the money management task to the fund operators.
Generally, a high-rate money market account pays a higher APY than a checking account because banks can assume that your money will be in there for a longer period. Yes, you could withdraw from a money market account – just like you could in a checking account – but a money market account has built-in restrictions because its transactions are restricted under Regulation D. Unlike a checking account, money market accounts are limited to six “convenient” transfers and withdrawals per month. According to the Federal Reserve, these restricted transfers and withdrawals include transfers to another account to act as overdraft protection, direct bill payments, telephone transfers, withdrawals initiated by fax, computer, email or internet instruction, and transfers or withdrawals made by check, debit card or other similar method used to pay other third parties.
The Money Market enables the commercial banks to use their excess reserves in profitable investment. The main objective of the commercial banks is to earn income from its reserves as well as maintain liquidity to meet the uncertain cash demand of the depositors. In the money market, the excess reserves of the commercial banks are invested in near-money assets (e.g., short-term bills of exchange), which are easily converted into cash. Thus, commercial banks earn profits without sacrificing liquidity.