Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
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An MMA is not a checking account. Some money market accounts have check-writing and debit card features. But, as with regular savings accounts, they are limited by the Federal Reserve to six “convenient” transfers or withdrawals a month — including by check, debit card swipe or online transfer. If you want the ability to write checks and make frequent withdrawals, you may be better off opening an interest-bearing checking account. (You can look for high-interest accounts by entering your ZIP code and minimum deposit in our interest checking tool.)
The first decentralized cryptocurrency, bitcoin, was created in 2009 by pseudonymous developer Satoshi Nakamoto. It used SHA-256, a cryptographic hash function, as its proof-of-work scheme.[14][15] In April 2011, Namecoin was created as an attempt at forming a decentralized DNS, which would make internet censorship very difficult. Soon after, in October 2011, Litecoin was released. It was the first successful cryptocurrency to use scrypt as its hash function instead of SHA-256. Another notable cryptocurrency, Peercoin was the first to use a proof-of-work/proof-of-stake hybrid.[16]
Institutional prime and institutional municipal money market mutual funds are funds that do not qualify as retail funds—i.e., they may be held by institutional investors. These funds are subject to potential liquidity fees and redemption gates, and will price and transact at a floating NAV (meaning that the NAV will be priced to 4 decimal places, e.g. $1.0000, and will experience fluctuations from time to time).
The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve Bank during the 2010s led to the short-term interest rates—the rates banks pay to borrow money from one another—hovering around zero percent. The near zero rates meant money market fund investors saw returns significantly lower, compared to those in the prior decades. Further, with the tightening of regulations after the 2008 financial crisis, the number of investable securities grew smaller.
An initial coin offering (ICO) is a controversial means of raising funds for a new cryptocurrency venture. An ICO may be used by startups with the intention of avoiding regulation. However, securities regulators in many jurisdictions, including in the U.S., and Canada have indicated that if a coin or token is an "investment contract" (e.g., under the Howey test, i.e., an investment of money with a reasonable expectation of profit based significantly on the entrepreneurial or managerial efforts of others), it is a security and is subject to securities regulation. In an ICO campaign, a percentage of the cryptocurrency (usually in the form of "tokens") is sold to early backers of the project in exchange for legal tender or other cryptocurrencies, often bitcoin or ether.[47][48][49]
Retail prime and retail municipal money market mutual funds have policies and procedures reasonably designed to limit all beneficial owners to "natural persons" (i.e., individual investors). These funds may continue to seek to maintain a stable $1.00 net asset value (NAV), but are subject to potential liquidity fees and redemption gates (i.e., the fund may impose a fee upon the sale of your shares, or may temporarily suspend your ability to sell shares, if the fund’s liquidity falls below required minimums because of market conditions or other factors).
A high-rate money market account can be both a worthwhile investment and a shorter-term savings tool for liquid money. It’s a worthwhile investment for money that needs to earn a competitive APY (annual percentage yield) and be kept safe. One of the safest places is an eligible account at a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) bank that’s within FDIC insurance limits. If your money market account is at an FDIC bank -- or has National Credit Union Share Insurance (NCUSIF) protection if it’s at an National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) credit union – then your account is covered if it’s within coverage limits.

The money market consists of financial institutions and dealers in money or credit who wish to either borrow or lend. Participants borrow and lend for short periods, typically up to twelve months. Money market trades in short-term financial instruments commonly called "paper". This contrasts with the capital market for longer-term funding, which is supplied by bonds and equity.