Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
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Interest rates determine how much interest your money market account earns. The more money you have in your money market account and the higher interest rate you’re earning, the more money you’ll earn on your money in this account. When the Federal Reserve raises or lowers the federal funds rate, its benchmark rate, that tends to affect the yields on money market accounts. Since December 2015, the Fed has raised rates nine times, which has helped some money market account yields increase.

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What to watch for: The eAccess Money Market account doesn’t have check-writing privileges and doesn’t offer a debit card, an ATM card for ATM access or the ability to send an outbound wire transfer. But you’re allowed to make up to six withdrawals via Online Banking per month. These can be made either via an external account transfer or byway of an ACH, which electronically debits your eAccess Money Market and sends the money to another financial institution. These may not exceed $250,000 per monthly statement cycle. United States citizens and permanent residents 18 years or older throughout the U.S. are eligible for the eAccess Money Market account, as long as they don’t live in New Jersey or New York.
What to watch for: The eAccess Money Market account doesn’t have check-writing privileges and doesn’t offer a debit card, an ATM card for ATM access or the ability to send an outbound wire transfer. But you’re allowed to make up to six withdrawals via Online Banking per month. These can be made either via an external account transfer or byway of an ACH, which electronically debits your eAccess Money Market and sends the money to another financial institution. These may not exceed $250,000 per monthly statement cycle. United States citizens and permanent residents 18 years or older throughout the U.S. are eligible for the eAccess Money Market account, as long as they don’t live in New Jersey or New York.
A money market account is a savings account that may come with higher interest rates than other savings accounts plus checks or a debit card. But MMAs often require much higher minimum deposits and balances. And although MMA interest rates have historically been higher than those of basic savings accounts, many currently are roughly the same. So comparing rates is an essential first step when considering a money market account.

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Money market funds seek to limit exposure to losses due to credit, market, and liquidity risks. Money market funds in the United States are regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) under the Investment Company Act of 1940. Rule 2a-7 of the act restricts the quality, maturity and diversity of investments by money market funds. Under this act, a money fund mainly buys the highest rated debt, which matures in under 13 months. The portfolio must maintain a weighted average maturity (WAM) of 60 days or less and not invest more than 5% in any one issuer, except for government securities and repurchase agreements.[4]
Institutional prime and institutional municipal money market mutual funds are funds that do not qualify as retail funds—i.e., they may be held by institutional investors. These funds are subject to potential liquidity fees and redemption gates, and will price and transact at a floating NAV (meaning that the NAV will be priced to 4 decimal places, e.g. $1.0000, and will experience fluctuations from time to time).
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The SEC would normally be the regulator to address the risks to investors taken by money market funds, however to date the SEC has been internally politically gridlocked. The SEC is controlled by five commissioners, no more than three of which may be the same political party. They are also strongly enmeshed with the current mutual fund industry, and are largely divorced from traditional banking industry regulation. As such, the SEC is not concerned over overall credit extension, money supply, or bringing shadow banking under the regulatory umbrella of effective credit regulation.

If this sounds similar to banks’ high-yield savings accounts or money market accounts, it is. The largest difference lies in the ability for yields on money market mutual funds to rise proportionately with interest rates. For example, as interest rates have risen, the yields on most bank  money market accounts (which are set by the banks themselves) have stayed relatively flat, while money market mutual fund yields have increased.