Successful Trader's Cheat Sheet
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Within a cryptocurrency network, only miners can confirm transactions by solving a cryptographic puzzle. They take transactions, mark them as legitimate and spread them across the network. Afterwards, every node of the network adds it to its database. Once the transaction is confirmed it becomes unforgeable and irreversible and a miner receives a reward, plus the transaction fees.

Uncovered Put


Fund yields are typically somewhat higher than bank savings accounts,[citation needed] but of course these are different products with differing risks (e.g., money fund accounts are not insured and are not deposit accounts). Since Retail funds generally have higher servicing needs and thus expenses than Institutional funds, their yields are generally lower than Institutional funds.
In 1998, Wei Dai published a description of "b-money", characterized as an anonymous, distributed electronic cash system.[12] Shortly thereafter, Nick Szabo described bit gold.[13] Like bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that would follow it, bit gold (not to be confused with the later gold-based exchange, BitGold) was described as an electronic currency system which required users to complete a proof of work function with solutions being cryptographically put together and published. A currency system based on a reusable proof of work was later created by Hal Finney who followed the work of Dai and Szabo.[citation needed]
Paul Krugman, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences winner does not like bitcoin, has repeated numerous times that it is a bubble that will not last[92] and links it to Tulip mania.[93] American business magnate Warren Buffett thinks that cryptocurrency will come to a bad ending.[94] In October 2017, BlackRock CEO Laurence D. Fink called bitcoin an 'index of money laundering'.[95] "Bitcoin just shows you how much demand for money laundering there is in the world," he said.
What to watch for: Balances less than $5,000 earn 0.05 percent APY. So if you’re going to go below that amount, you probably should get an account with a lower minimum balance to get a competitive APY. There is also a $50 account closing fee if you close the platinum money market account within 90 days of account opening. Residents of Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri and Wisconsin are excluded from opening this account.
Over time, money market fund "depositors" felt more and more secure, and not really at risk. Likewise, on the other end, corporations saw the attractive interest rates and incredibly easy ability to constantly roll over short term commercial paper. Using rollovers they then funded longer and longer term obligations via the money markets. This expands credit. It’s also over time clearly long-term borrowing on one end, funded by an on-demand depositor on the other, with some substantial obfuscation as to what is ultimately going on in between.
Only Invest in Mutual Funds You Understand: If you can't explain, quickly, succinctly, and with specificity, exactly how a mutual fund invests, what its underlying holdings are, what the risks of the mutual fund's investment strategy are, and why you own a particular mutual fund, you probably shouldn't have it in your portfolio.  It's much easier to measure, contain, and appreciate risk when you keep things simple.
The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve Bank during the 2010s led to the short-term interest rates—the rates banks pay to borrow money from one another—hovering around zero percent. The near zero rates meant money market fund investors saw returns significantly lower, compared to those in the prior decades. Further, with the tightening of regulations after the 2008 financial crisis, the number of investable securities grew smaller.

You’re generally able to access the money in your account at any time without incurring a penalty. An exception is if you were to close a money market account that has an early close-out penalty. These penalties usually occur during the first 90-180 days of opening the account. Also, a bank is required to reserve the right to require at least seven days’ written notice if you want to withdraw from a money market account. But, as noted by the Federal Reserve, this right is rarely, if ever, exercised.
A high-rate money market account can be both a worthwhile investment and a shorter-term savings tool for liquid money. It’s a worthwhile investment for money that needs to earn a competitive APY (annual percentage yield) and be kept safe. One of the safest places is an eligible account at a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC) bank that’s within FDIC insurance limits. If your money market account is at an FDIC bank -- or has National Credit Union Share Insurance (NCUSIF) protection if it’s at an National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) credit union – then your account is covered if it’s within coverage limits.
Some mutual funds specialize in investing in stocks, some in bonds, some in real estate, some in gold. The list practically goes on and on with mutual funds organized for nearly every type of investing strategy or niche you can imagine. There are even funds designed for people who only want to own dividend stocks in the S&P 500 that have increased the dividend every year for the past 25 years! It is safe to say that there is a mutual fund for almost any niche or investing objective you may wish to achieve.
While it’s very easy to buy Bitcoins - there are numerous exchanges in existence that trade in BTC - other cryptocurrencies aren’t as easy to acquire. Although, this situation is slowly improving with major exchanges like Kraken, BitFinex, BitStamp and many others starting to sell Litecoin, Ethereum, Monero, Ripple and so on. There are also a few other different ways of being coin, for instance, you can trade face-to-face with a seller or use a Bitcoin ATM.
Government Normally at least 99.5% of the fund’s total assets are invested in cash, U.S. government securities and/or repurchase agreements that are collateralized fully (i.e., collateralized by cash or government securities)—including at least 80% in U.S. government securities and repurchase agreements for those securities. Certain issuers of U.S. government securities (e.g., “Government-Sponsored Enterprises” such as Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the Federal Home Loan Banks) are sponsored or chartered by Congress, but their securities are neither issued by nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.